BLINK BRLN

This month we followed the multi-sensual traces of the Italian multi-media artist Francesco Misceo. His art present us a holistic intertwining between the digital-machinic and the analog-organic sphere of the human body.

Together, we enter an atmosphere of a dreamlike poem that enfolds in front of us and affects all our senses. With Misceo, we are welcome to explore the manifold ways of expressing our bodies.

In his short art piece “Late night Tale” Francesco Misceo shows us a body in motion, dancing, as vehicle that transcends the body.

Touching and feeling the air, the heat, the coldness of the room around its skin. Sensing the hardness and the softness of the objects in its reach and out of reach. The body is in contact with his surrounding and other objects – like the flashlights – that help it transcend itself. Even though this piece is not danced outside in the nature, like many of his other pieces, still, we sense the connectedness and exteriority of the body.

The art piece itself navigates and convey on the imagery level between the half-naked moved body of flesh, muscles, and bones and the pulsing astral body of thousand starlike photons.

Maybe this is a reason why Misceo used lights at his hands. The hands don’t need daylight to see. The hands are light itself and for themselves. And the burst of the body might be then the freed emotions and motions, the liberated intensities that sleeps in our body until the daytime ends and starts to spread out when our body starts to dance.

The body becomes a particle drift of infinitive affects, motions, and emotions
that stream across space and time and towards an impossible and infinitive end.

The “Late night Tale” is therefore always the tale of the body, a tale that is spoken when the day is gone, when night and its darkness arise and when our eyes become tired, and our hands wake up. Or maybe the “Late night Tale” cannot be shown but just be danced? Not been spoken but just felt?

In any way, in this tale – in his or our “Late night Tale” we lose the borders of our contemporary self, we start to dream (of) a body, a body of streams and clouds that slips away from its daily cover.

Especially when we go with our body undercover, when we hear and feel its movements and passions. In the night the body discovers its own rhythm and movement, its own stream when it is moving around and beyond borders.

This and much more is there in Misceos beautiful sensitive and quiet, rapturous, and expanding dance in which he invites us to dance the body and play with it. And in this movement, we might find something what laid hidden within ourselves. Other layers and photons that energize us and want to set free.




Artist review © Niklas Pekka for Blink Berlin | Contact: niklas@blinkberlin.com

TATTOO ART | Interview by Kate Black

What is real_? Julim Rosa

''Do what you need to feel at home in your body''. That was her message, one year ago, after standing half-naked inside a Gallery window display in Berlin, covering her body with stencil tattoos. How she kept spreading her thoughts and questions during a very unexpected year? What is her main inspiration? Read all about Julim and her glitched universe.

What would you say are the 3 most important topics that you want to address as an artist?

I feel like the topics that I address in my practice evolve and change with time, but at the same time there's some core ideas that transcend the almost 15 years I've been producing art. If I had to pick 3 they would be reality, permanence and the questioning of convention.

What does the word "distortion" means to you Julim? How did it end up being the focal point of your tattoo style?

Distorting a concept, for me, is a way of exploring it. I use distortion to explore what's the meaning of TIME, REALITY, GENDER, NORMALITY or PERMANENCE, for example.


What would you say are the 3 most important topics that you want to address as an artist?

I feel like the topics that I address in my practice evolve and change with time, but at the same time there's some core ideas that transcend the almost 15 years I've been producing art. If I had to pick 3 they would be reality, permanence and the questioning of convention.

What does the word "distortion" means to you Julim? How did it end up being the focal point of your tattoo style?

Distorting a concept, for me, is a way of exploring it. I use distortion to explore what's the meaning of TIME, REALITY, GENDER, NORMALITY or PERMANENCE, for example. It allows me to grab a word and softly make it go through waves, radically glitch it, break it into geometric shapes, or even distort it until the legibility is gone and it turned into a completely abstract composition.

Through distortion I ask questions. I interact with the concept, challenge it's conventional meaning and explore how it makes me feel.

I think it ended up being a distinctive point in my tattoo practice because other people connected to this idea of questioning, and having their own take, their own experience with this process. I help humans create their own personal distortion of a concept and then get it tattooed tailored to their particular body.

I am really interested to know more about your performative work. It is not something that you see often when it comes to tattoo artistry.

Tattooing appeared in my life around 10 years ago, in a kind-of performative way. Back in Buenos Aires I shared an atelier with a friend and one summer we decided to build a tattoo machine from a tutorial we found online. Using a hair dryer motor, a button, a fork, a pen and a guitar string we built this DIY machine and tattooed each other. This kind of fell into my bigger art exploration, but then I got so fascinated by the permanence and intensity of the tattoo practice that I decided I wanted to really learn it and do it professionally. It was like learning a new media and I fell so deeply in love with it, but art and being a creative person came first, as I know it happened to so many other humans who were artists before tattooing. Maybe every tattoo I do is, in some way, a piece in collaboration with the human that receives it.

Do you think that there is a discrimination against women's bodies, bodies with tattoos or bodies in general that you wanted to address with your performance "Never too much"? I know the answer is probably all 3 but I am curious to see which inspired you most in your performance and why.

The performance was inspired by a personal experience of walking around Berlin wearing shorts on one of the first days of summer. I felt so observed. Strangers were making comments about my appearance. This was like a shortcut in my brain to the years I lived in Latin America, where woman and gender non conforming people are constantly harassed, oppressed, discriminated, judged and killed. I remembered feeling so much shame, guilt, sadness. So at this point I decided I wanted to make a statement and take it to the extreme.

I did a performance in the window of a gallery, where I was standing naked for 1 hour, and all I was doing was covering my body completely with tattoo stencils. I felt really exposed, but also super empowered.

It felt like asking society "What happens when I transcend the limits of what you expect from me? Who determines what is "right" and "acceptable" when we are talking about my body?

It happened in Berlin but I was streaming it on Instagram Live to the rest of the world. The action ended with the message "Do what you need to feel at home in YOUR body".